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Leaving your iAVs for a period of time.

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  • Leaving your iAVs for a period of time.

    Hi everyone,

    I'm in the process of planning from scratch an iAVs for my backyard but life has thrown a curly one at me.
    I have an opportunity which may come up soon to expand my horizons in my work career but it will involve being way from home and leaving my system alone for 2 weeks at a time on a regular basis.
    How can I design a system which will cope with that? What should I incorporate to cope? Any suggestions?

    Cheers.

  • #2
    Hi BD
    You should incorporate your wife

    cheers

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    • #3
      No intensive food production system that I know of will accommodate fortnightly absences on the part of the farmer. Perhaps you should take a sabbatical from iAVs until you have the time to devote to it.

      Comment


      • #4
        LOL Ande, the wife won't touch it he, he, he.

        Hi Gary,

        The basics of my back yard are nearly complete. I'm almost up to the stage of installing the plumbing and base plus building the grow beds and fish tanks

        If this opportunity comes up, a sabbatical from iAVs is an option, We'll see Just throwing the idea out there in case anyone has any thoughts.

        Cheers.

        Comment


        • #5
          Automation will allow you to achieve what you want. There's very little that can't be remotely monitored and operated, Regrettably, however, managing all of the operating parameters - and the risks - will probably cost you more than you are going to earn in your new opportunity.

          In your situation, I'd continue to build and refine your system during your home stints but I'd leave the fish out of it until you can put a pair of human footprints on the job.

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          • #6
            BD, I've just been away from home for almost three weeks, and left my "iAVS inspired" system in the care of our housekeeper. She has never fed fish in her life before, and yet, my system was in perfect condition upon my return. With my normal AP system, there is usually a bit of TLC (and lots of guilt) involved.

            I won't suggest this as a standard operating procedure but as far as I am concerned, you can get away with a lot with iAVS. Even if you get it wrong completely, it still sort of works. Of course, to do it properly, the human footprints are non-negotiable.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Nicol du Toit View Post
              I won't suggest this as a standard operating procedure but as far as I am concerned, you can get away with a lot with iAVS. Even if you get it wrong completely, it still sort of works. Of course, to do it properly, the human footprints are non-negotiable.
              That's the part that excites me about iAVs. So long as you respect the cornerstones...suitable sand...furrows... intermittent irrigation...you are going to get a satisfying result.

              Where the upper and lower limits of these things lie has yet to be determined.

              Critics of iAVs complain that the production claims are over 30 years old. I'm pretty certain that we're going to see productivity improvements to no less an extent than soil-based horticulture, DWC aquaponics or hydroponics as iAVs hits its straps.

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